PIPPA BLAKE & KOS EVANS VOYAGE 7TH – 21ST JUNE 2008

6th December 2011

EXHIBITION DATES: 7TH -21ST JUNE 2008

Artist Pippa Blake and photographer Kos Evans use their individual mediums to create work transcending their traditional boundaries. This exhibition celebrates their lifelong fascination with the sea and is the result of several months’ collaboration. The work captures a sense of escapism associated with sea voyages, the sense of infinity and the ever present horizon.

“This project is a radical departure from my sports photography” says Kos. “I am known for taking pictures 200ft up the mast of an ocean racer, hanging out of a helicopter or te

thered to a racing mark underwater, but I wanted to take photographs that could have been painted, creating an ambiguous image open to many interpretations’.

Like Kos, Pippa Blake has spent all her life associated with the sea. She has sailed the world’s oceans and circumnavigated the globe. “My studio faces Chichester harbour:  the sea, sky and sunsets are part of my daily life. I have always been fascinated by the horizon and the sense of what lies beyond.”

Pippa’s work conveys a sense of the unknown and although based on memory and observation, the paintings refer to a universal sea as a metaphor for life. Last year she spent three weeks on a research ship between Newfoundland and Iceland and the sea and weather conditions she captured in sketches and photographs are incorporated in these paintings.

Kos Evans first met artist Pippa Blake in 1981, when Pippa’s husband, the late Sir Peter Blake was competing in the Whitbread Round the World Race. Since then their paths have crossed the globe at many events. Both artists have found the experience of working together hugely liberating.  Pippa has used images shot by Kos as a departure for some of her paintings.  She has also developed a technique of layering transparent film over her sketches and applying further layers of paint.  In collaborative works, Pippa has painted over the surface of photographs shot by Kos while other pieces combine elements of painting and photography in a collage technique.